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them. >> rose: we close this evening with a conversation about the global economy with india's minister of finance. >> you see, we require massive investment to build our country. the bulk of it comes from domestic savings but we still require at a margin, foreign investment, for that brings technology. that brings invasion, that brings better management skills and management management practices. it opens new markets for us. it introduces us to new products. that is the advantage of getting fdi. >> the texas explosion,s bots to-- boston investigation and the global economy when we continue. >> rose: funding for charlie rose was provided by the following:. >> rose: additional funding provided by these funders. and by bloomberg provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. . >> rose: we begin this evening with the explosion at a fertilizer plant in west texas which is near waco. here is the explosion which took place last night. at last count five people have died and mo
,s bots to-- boston investigation and the global economy when we continue. >> rose: funding for charlie rose was provided by the following:. >> rose: additional funding provided by these funders. and by bloomberg provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. . >> rose: we begin this evening with the explosion at a fertilizer plant in west texas which is near waco. here is the explosion which took place last night. at last count five people have died and more than 160 injured. it produced ground motion equivalent to that of a magnitude 2.1 earthquake. the mayor of west said it felt as if nuclear bomb dded. buildings within a five block rad yux-- radius were damaged. the search for survivors is ongoing. investigators are trying to determine the exact cause of an explosion. a small fire is believed to have spread to fertilizer tanks. governor perry held a press conference earlier and here is what he said. >> also spoke to the local officials to make sure they have the supp
to focus on the longer term fundamentals, which we still think are pretty good. the economy is still growing. earnings are still growing. the fed still pretty supportive. certainly volatility has picked up a bit this week. and we expect that to continue here in the near term. >> that's what i was going to ask you. assuming that this manhunt is solved and the suspect is apprehended this weekend, turning to monday, how do you think things are going to play out? what is going to happen next in the market? is volatility still going to dominate trading? are the markets going to go up? are they going to go down? what is your prediction? >> i think you have both macro and microtrends next week. as you said in the lead there, about 20% of companies in the s&p reported earnings. but it really gets heavy next week. we have about 170 companies in the s&p 500 reporting, and about ten dow components. and earnings have been mixed. they have been okay. topline has been a little soft. as bob pisani said, only about 45% of companies are beat top line. it reflects the sluggish global economy that we h
the stock averages and they've been told the economy is doing great, so what's changed? you know, what's changed is that we got a little complacent. i think everybody looks at the market and says we weren't really fulling gauging what might happen if the economy slows down or doesn't speed up. i think today was just the wreck reckoning for a lot of those concerns. >> we've been in a period where people are expecting a correction from whatever highs we've been hitting here lately. do you think this is the beginning of that correction right now? >> i think we're certainly seeing a bit of a correction. i don't know how much more it has tooz, however, because fundamentally, we have very low interest rates and u.s. corporations are still posting record high levels of earnings against the backdrop of a weak global economy. if we get a big downdraft from whatever happens out of boston or some other factor, that's a real risk factor, but near term, very strong earnings, hard to argue with stocks with that backdrop. >> you just mexed the boston marathon incident. we doebt have the complete stor
years, union bank, and fidelity investments. >> your personal economy has made up of the things that matter most, including your career. as those things change, fidelity can help you readjust your retirement plan. rethink how you are invested and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are today, a fidelity ira has a wide range of investment choices that can take your personal economy. fidelity investments. turn here. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: law enforcement officials say the surviving suspect in the boston bombings has admitted he did play a role in the attacks, and they believe he and his brother acted alone. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the investigation, and the condition of dzhokar tsarnaev, upgraded today to fair. >> woodruff: plus, jeffrey brown examines the lessons learned for public safety officials about security at big events and gatherings. >> ifill: then, a powerful democrat, montana's max baucus, is the eighth senator to say he won't see
economy looks like. and as life changes, fidelity can help you readjust your investments along the way. refocus as careers change and kids and head off to college. and rebuild your plan. wherever you are today, fidelity's guidance can help you refine your personal economy. turn here. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business. offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? and now bbc world news america. world newsbbc america. reportingrong am katty kay. they hav endured. residents of boston have been warned not to go outside as police search for the suspect in the boston marathon bombing. the father of the boys defenses son -- his sons. >> only god almighty knows what really happens. >> we still do not know what motivated the attack. did the brothers of the lawn or is it part of a wider terror -- did the brothers act on their own, or is it part of a wider terror plot? we talk to the man in charge of homelan
economy is made up of the things that matter most, including your career. as those things change fidelity can help you jafflet your retirement plan, rethink how you are invested and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are today the fidelity i.r.a. has a wagering of choices to fit your personal economy. fidelity investments, turn here. >> bbc world news was captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: the surviving suspect in the boston bombings was charged today with the use of a weapon of mass destruction. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, we update the investigation, both in the u.s. and abroad, into the two brothers believed to be behind the blasts, as the youngest remains hospitalized in serious, but stable condition. >> ifill: and we explore the legal questions raised by trying dzhokhar tsarnaev in federal court. >> brown: then, ray suarez gets an update on guantanamo bay, where more than half the prisoners are now on a hunger strike, protesting their indefinite detentions. >> ifill: paul solman ha
." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: rescuers worked in wet weather today to find survivors amid the rubble from the fiery explosion at a texas fertilizer plant last night. late today, authorities acknowledged there were fatalities but declined to confirm how many. earlier estimates ranged from five to 15 though there were reports the toll would go much higher. the cause of the fire and explosion is still not known; officials said today there's no evidence of foul play. a man using his cell phone captured the moment last night when the west fertilizer company plant exploded. that flattened buildings withi
and pursuing the comgo f overyears, fidelity investments, union bank, your personal economy is made up of the things that matter most, including your career. as those things change, fidelity can help you adjust your retirement plan. rethink and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are today, a fidelity ira has a wide range of investment choices that can fit your personal economy. fidelity investments. turn here. >> bbc world news was presented >> bbc world news was presented by kcet, - hi, neighbor! today at school, we're choosing something new for the playground! swings or slide! they're both fun to play on! and then, we get to choose a new class pet! be right back. is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and he arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to sengthening america's future through education. adcasting
very quickly because the economy can't continue the way it is among other things giving gasoline away. they can't go on that way. >> nick raised the question of ideology. it's important to note that the opposition it wasn't an election about ideology. the opposition, what was fascinating about it is it ran on a comain to administer it more efficiently. they accepted the social missions. they accepted even the foreign policy. dressed in red. he was in some ways praising chavez and saying that maduro wasn't worthy. he see it wasn't an election about ideology but an election about continuing the goals. it's been remarkable. the way to think about it is to step back and really consider that this remarkable experiment in social democracy that we've seen more in south america than central america and mexico but a little bit in central america since for the last 10, 15 years beginning in some ways with chavez's election is outlasting. it's first-generation of leaders. lula went through his two terms. >> charlie: many people say he was a champion of the people who chavez thought he was the ch
-blooming self-starters. it's the latest chapter in his look at older workers in the american economy and all part of his on-going reporting "making sense of financial news." >> look at this nice, tight stomach with the abs which you could grate cheese on. >> reporter: at 55, judi henderson-townsend is working with a much younger crowd. >> it's like living in the land of dorian gray here. nobody ever ages. >> reporter: after a career spent working with stiffs in the corporate world, says townsend, she started mannequin madness. >> i sell mannequins, i rent mannequins, i repair mannequins, i blog about mannequins. here in our warehouse, we recycle them for the stores for free and then we resell them or rent them to other people. >> reporter: so you mean all those good looking folk back there were going to be dumped. >> those were going to be tossed into the landfill because the store didn't need them anymore. they're just maybe a few years old, but structurally nothing is wrong with them. it's like having a pre-owned lexus. >> reporter: townsend thinks she's modeling a trend: the rise of the m
: you can come here and help us understand the economy for start starters. >> yeah, that would be fun. that would be fun. >> rose: thank you, congratulations. >> well thanks for having me on. >> rose: rick levin. 20 years, 1993 to 2013 as president of yale university came and yale was not in great shape, he leaves it in fantastic shape. thank you for joining us. see you next time. . >> this is "nightly business report," brought to on you by thestreet.com. multi-media tools for an ever changing financial world. real money helps you think through ideas for investing and trading stocks. action alerts plus is a charitable portfolio that provides trade by trade strategies. online, mobile, social media, we are thestreet.com. a big win for netflix, the stock soaring more than 20% after hours on a strong earnings report. but a big miss for caterpillars they fall short of estimates and the ceo talks about the health of the global economy. and cracked foundation, is the shortage of homes for sale creating a speed bump for the recovery. >>> good everyone, it was a strong earning report late in t
provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, sony pictures classics, now presenting "the company you keep," union bank, and fidelity investments. >> this is what a personal economy looks like. as life changes, fidelity can help you readjust your investments along the w
economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, united healthcare, , and fidelity investments. what a personal economy looks like. and as lifehangfidelity can help you readjust your investments along the way. refocus as careers change and kids and head off to college. and rebuild your plan. wherever you are today, fidelity's guidance can help you refine your
enough to sell into somebody's lower income economies. they're never going to be the lowest price people, that's not in their d.n.a. but they may have to do something a little bit less expensive. >> rose: back to the point that i think technology is so interesting today. one as i just said is underdeveloped countries and it gives them the opportunity to leap ahead and do things. two is education. >> absolutely. >> rose: it's what the possibilities are. how you can educate. where you can get degrees and you can sit in india and take courses at harvard. >> right. >> yes. >> there's a lock going on. the university that larry summers is involved in. it was a whole university. >> and three which you just mentioned is health care. the possibilities of being able to understand and diagnose and getting access to information. >> there's diabetes apps, heart apps. >> three there's a thing you can put on there which is a glucose meter like kara was saying which of course, die s diabetics have to measure their glucose now instead of being having a glucose meter. it's not just a computer, it can tran
: in a rapidly growing economy, daughters have become an increasing financial liability for their families says this sociologist. >> that don't want to pay dowries, they want to receive dowries. they want to give more education to the boys than to the girls because for them the boys are still more important. >> reporter: and the census shows indians are acting on that bias. for every 1,000 male infants born, there are just 914 females. in some regions, far fewer. in nature, those numbers are about equal. >> the gap began to wideen in the '90s with new ultrasound machines that made it easy to learn the fetus' sex. the scan led to the termination of millions of female pregnancies. in delhi, the center for social research has organized women into neighborhood groups trying to shift the ingrained gender bias, even invoking hinduism's goddess of prosperity. >> ( translated ): we must begin to welcome girl babies into our homes, like the goddess lack shi has come into our home. lack smi. >> reporter: they're also aware of the law that's become known by its english acronym. that's the pre-conception a
funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you.
.s. economy and the deepening crisis in europe. they cut china's growth to 8% from 8.2%. >> a slow down in gdp in china got the blame. but ford does not see it that way, they are protecting that 40% of the sale s will come fro china. they have doubled their capacity, scrambling to keep up with demand to keep up with the market. we have a closer look at ford's rapid expansion there and the challenges it faces. >> he is part of the new wave in china. car buyers turning the western part of the country into one of the hottest auto markets in the world. >> translator: in his mind, he feels that the car, the brand is good. and the service is also excellent. so this is why he trusts this brand. >> here, the gateway to western china, growth in auto sales is particularly good news for ford. at this plant, a new focus roles off the assembly line every minute and within two years ford will be doubling capacity in the area. >> this year, the total volume of the ford, were 600,000. so it's a big, big key. >> growing sales in china have been one of the top goals since he took over ford in 2006. at the time,
opportunity for climate change to boost the other objective. help for the california economy. in the last seven years, china is a power house in climate technology, but for the innovation, the country has a huge demand for more. >> that is the question we get asked. tell us about what are people doing in the u.s. what are the technologies. can you bring those to china? >> that's where this trade mission has enormous opportunities. >> every ton of garbage creates the greenhouse gasses. we can turn that into clean energy. >> mike hart from davis came on this trip searching for investors. his company turns solid waste into gas and ultimately electricity. the company can turn a ton of garbage into 1,600 kilowatts of power. >> we will have one significant partner as a result of the trip. that could result in several hundred million dollars of construction projects. >> california also stands to benefit from chinese experts. the country is a leading source of car batteries. governor brown who toured one chinese battery and electric car company says california's goal of 1 million electric cars by
, with difficulty in keeping together the chavez coalition in resolving the deep problems of the economy in light of a devaluation in resolving the atrocious situation of crime and violence in the country. how he will keep those very factions of the party together and at the same time tackle these very deep seated problems is really a big question. i think it leaves open the possibility for a great deal more instability. >> suarez: it sounds like it's going to be difficult to run venezuela, whoever takes the loath of president. 30-plus percent inflation, high crimes. those facts. >> 20% last year. it's picked up a little in the last few months but or significantly in the last few months. i think that was part of the problem for maduro. i think there are serious challenges ahead. we don't want to exaggerate them too much. for 14 years, the business press has been saying that the venezuelan economy is going to collapse. it never did. it won't either. they always say it's unsus sanable. that's what we had in 2006 when you have an $8 trillion housing bubble and anybody who is looking at it which did
, union bank, and fidelity investments. >> this is what a personal economy looks like. as life changes, fidelity can help you readjust your investments along the way, refocus as careers change and kids head off to college, and revisit your plan as retirement gets closer. wherever you are today, fidelity's guidance can help fine-tune your personal economy. fidelity investments -- turn here. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." "bbc world news america "reporting from washington. the white house says yesterday's bombing does not seem to be part of a broader plot. >> this was a heinous and cowardly act. given what we now know about what took place, the fbi is investigating it as an act of terrorism. >> but who did this and why is still a mystery. authorities are asking the public to hand in any photos or video recordings. amid ti
there's an economy and you struggle hard to develop that if you can. but when you're in the theater if people are 40 or 50 feet away there's a lot you have to do with your voice. you have to be able to talk in a way he has a laugh line every night where he says "i'm not prejudice, i'd say that to a blank or a blank." the racial line. and that line should work if you start with "i'm not prejudice, harold." they've got to hear that. but there's always in the theater -- the heavy lifting is done by the actors in order to pull the audience where you want to go. >> rose: do you find that true? this is the first time you've been on broadway. >> this is the first time i've been on broadway. i've done theater in london but it is extraordinary how different so far the experience has been. >> rose: how so? >> well, because i think american audiences are so much more vociferous and kind of -- literally it feels like i imagine kind of elizabethan theater would have been like. >> rose: engaged? >> massively engaged. so responsive to minutia and -- and i think when i first thought this play -- an
. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "nightly business report." >> the dow falls sharply after yesterday's big move higher. we'll move beyond the volatility and get investment strategy for the long term. >> low rate? who wins and loses with interest rates at record-low levels. >> an art gallery bust.
night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >>> this is "nightly business report" with tyler mathisen and susie gharib, brought to you by -- >> thestreet.com. interactive financial multimedia tools for an ever changing financial world. our dividend stock adviser guides and helps generate income during a period of low interest rates. real money helps you think through ideas for investing and trading stocks. action alerts plus is a charitable trust portfolio that provides trade-by-trade strategies, online, mobile, social me
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)

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